At Cinemas: The death continues in the Ice Age sequel – The Post

At Cinemas: The death continues in the Ice Age sequel

We’re already missing our film nut
July 8th, 2016 7:00 pm| by Mark Walker
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In decades to come, 2016 will be talked about in hushed tones throughout entertainment industry. They’ll refer to this year as The Talent Slayer – regardless of what happens in the coming second half. Early obituaries included David Bowie and Prince – and just this last weekend we’ve learned about the deaths of Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami (Taste Of Cherry), American director Michael Cimino (The Deer Hunter), British director Robin Hardy (The Wicker Man) and Caroline Aherne, star and co-creator of BAFTA-wining sitcom The Royle Family. The BBC broadcast 24 obituaries in January alone…

It also looks like curtains for Manny, Diego and Sid when a meteor strike signals the end of the world in Ice Age: Collision Course. Potentially marking the death of the franchise, reviews for this fifth installment have been appropriately cool. Most screenings will be dubbed in danish, so look in listings for showings in the original English. If language is a concern, please note that this week’s review is for director Dágur Kari’s Nordic Council and CPH:PIX winning film, Virgin Mountain, which will screen in Icelandic with Danish subs.



This week also sees the death of cinema in Copenhagen. Well, temporarily at least, until you’ve finished summer holidaying. And that doesn’t include all cinemas or the multiplexes (check kino.dk), so over the coming month you can still look forwards to tentpole pictures such as Tarzan, Steven Spielberg’s Big Friendly Giant, Star Trek Beyond, Jason Bourne and a new Ghostbusters – apparently causing controversy among nostalgic sexists for its all-female cast. For those whom popcorn munching is less of a necessity and more of a nuisance, the likes of Cinemateket, Gloria and Huset will open doors again in August.

In a more permanent sense, this issue marks the end of my tenure as Film section editor and reviewer at the Post, so I’d like to thank you, the readers, our team at The Post and urge your continued support for the most beautiful art form in human history. Keep watching, keep dreaming and I’ll see you on the other side…