Air Canada to expand services to Copenhagen - The Post

Air Canada to expand services to Copenhagen

Meanwhile, Ethiopian Airlines choose Oslo over the Danish capital

Air Canada will use its largest aircraft to service the route to Copenhagen next summer (photo: iStock)
November 28th, 2016 3:50 pm| by Lucie Rychla

Air Canada has announced it will again offer daily flights from Copenhagen to Toronto during the next summer season – starting in June.

The carrier will also increase its capacity by using the company’s largest aircraft, the Boeing 777-300ER, which seats 400 passengers.

Already in February, the airline will start using larger aircraft and will expand its current services from three weekly flights to four, and in late March to five.

The combination of larger aircraft and more weekly flights will more than double the number of seats available to travellers heading to Canada or the US during the high summer season.

READ MORE: Copenhagen Airport among the best in the world at developing new routes

Ethiopian Airlines choose Oslo
Meanwhile, Copenhagen Ariport has failed to attract one of Africa’s largest carriers: Ethiopian Airlines, which has chosen Oslo’s Gardermoen Airport as its second Scandinavian destination.

Ethiopian Airlines flew regularly to Copenhagen Airport until 2003, when the route moved to Stockholm-Arlanda.

From March 27, the African Star Alliance company will be operating direct flights between Oslo and Addis Ababa, with a stopover in Stockholm four times a week. Later it will expand to five weekly flights.

The route will be serviced by Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner with space for 270 passengers.

“We are proud of the fact that Africa’s largest airline is commencing its service five times a week between Oslo Airport and Addis Ababa Bole International Airport,” Øyvind Hasaas, the managing director of Oslo Airport, told Life in Norway.

“Norway now has a route to the best connected airport in Africa in terms of transfers to other African destinations. This ensures great opportunities for Norwegian tourists as well as Norwegian businesses and freight.”