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Children across the country starting the longest (school) day of their lives

It’s the first day under the new education reforms, but some say they are still not ready


I swear that clock never moves ... (Photo: Colourbox)

August 11, 2014
08:58

by Ray Weaver


The school bell this morning signals the start of the first year under the new school reforms, which include a longer day for all children.

In theory, students in grades 1-3 (ages 7-9) will be at school from 8am until 2pm, students in grades 4-6 (ages 10-12) will start at 8am and be at school until 3pm, while students in grades 7-9 (ages 13-15) will have the longest day, starting at 8am and finishing up at 3:30pm.

Survey suggests uncertainty
Many headteachers and other school leaders say that the longer school day may not fall into place right away, according to an unscientific poll conducted by DR Nyheder. About 50 percent of those responding said that implementing the longer days would take some time.

“That is the way it always goes with reforms,” Allen Hjortshøj, the headteacher at Holme school near Aarhus, told DR Nyheder.

“You cannot expect everything to be in place from day one.”

Turning the ship
Hjortshøj estimated it could take as long as two or three years before the new reforms really take hold.

“It is a bit like turning a supertanker. You can’t do it all at once,” he said.

All good by Christmas
However, the Socialdemokraterne spokesperson for children and education, Annette Lind, doesn’t think the changes will be that hard to implement.

“I am sure that once the teachers get started, they will be professional enough to ensure that it won't take too long to iron out all the creases,” she said.

“I am sure we will have come a very long way by Christmas.”



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