Copenhagen agrees to flexible work hours for public workers – The Post

Copenhagen agrees to flexible work hours for public workers

Being able to have a say in working hours has a considerable impact on job satisfaction

In Denmark, there’s more to life than work (photo: Pixabay)
February 3rd, 2017 12:30 pm| by Christian W

In the future, employees working for Copenhagen Municipality will be able to have flexible work hours following a unanimous decision by the local politicians at City Hall.

The flex time proposal, put forth by the deputy major for health and care, Ninna Thomsen, was agreed upon by all parties at City Hall yesterday.

“I’m enormously proud to represent a municipality which dares to traverse new paths in regards to securing the best possible work conditions for its employees,” said Thomsen.

“Flexibility gives freedom back to the employees and our trial efforts have shown positive effects on job satisfaction.”

Thomsen said that the flex time will be available for all 10,000 employees in the health and care administration when the pilot trial ends in November 2017, while the pilot will also serve as a model for flex time efforts in other areas of the public sector.

READ MORE: Government wants Danes to work more

Aarhus and Aalborg keen
The economy administration will now be tasked with developing a model for how flex time can be spread to all administrations and work groups in Copenhagen Municipality.

“We are in different life situation in various points in our lives, and that naturally impacts how much we are able or wish to work,” said Thomsen.

“A work space should be able to accommodate that and our experiences tell us that it benefits job satisfaction when employees can participate in deciding their working hours.”

The initial evaluation of the pilot project revealed that flexible working hours can have a significant impact on job satisfaction and almost 30 percent of employees would consider working more or less in the near future.

In light of the success, Aalborg, Aarhus and Vejle municipalities are considering following in Copenhagen’s footsteps.

Meanhile, the government is leaning in another direction. Employment minister said earlier this week that Danes should be spending more time working.