Copenhagen to get 250 container houses for students – The Post

Copenhagen to get 250 container houses for students

Project CPH Village aims to provide sustainable solution to the lack of affordable housing in the Danish capital

You can see two demo houses at Refshalevej 169G (photo: Facebook/CPH Village)
March 15th, 2017 3:28 pm| by Lucie Rychla
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Later this month, Parliament is expected to pass a bill that will make it possible for companies to build temporary student housing on undeveloped land for a period of up to 10 years.

If everything goes to plan, a project called CPH Village will begin the construction of its first student village, which will include 250 container homes, on Copenhagen’s Refshaleøen.



Students will either be able to register for a 20 sqm apartment (monthly rent starts at 3,850 kroner) or a 40 sqm apartment (5,850 kroner).

The village will include a communal area and offer various activities and services, such as food delivery.

Already today, there are two demo container houses standing at Refshalevej 169G, which give potential users an idea of how they are designed and constructed.

READ MORE: Demolished Ungdomshuset to host new container village for homeless at Jagtvej 69

Bold plans for the future
The startup project is being driven by Frederik Noltenius Busck and Michael Plesner, whose main goal is to offer a sustainable solution to the ever-growing problem of a lack of affordable student housing in the capital.

Their plan for the future is to expand beyond Denmark and build 2,500 container homes by 2020 in countries such as Sweden, Germany and the US.

Their current project in Refshaleøen has managed to attract investment interest from Danish pension companies.

Busck told News Øresund that they will be able to start the process of building the village as soon as Parliament passes the bill.

The company will use old containers from Maersk, which will be raised upon a 40 cm-high platform – partly to avoid having to dig into ground that might have been contaminated in the past, and partly to make room for wiring and pipes.