Danish Round-Up: Clock ticking on Koran burner’s bid to stand election – The Post

Danish Round-Up: Clock ticking on Koran burner’s bid to stand election

In other news, the days of many historical buildings could be numbered, warn experts, unless better fire safety standards are introduced

Rasmus Paludan (photo: screenshot)
April 24th, 2019 12:22 pm| by Ben Hamilton

It would appear that inciting violence on the streets of Nørrebro at the tax-payer’s expense is good business for Koran-burning lawyer Rasmus Paludan and his party Stram Kurs.

Since the episode, his party has received nearly 7,000 endorsements from the general public, taking the number up from 5,526 to 12,174 as of yesterday morning.

Still needs another 8,000
In total, Paludan will need 20,109 approved voter declarations in order to take part in the election.

But the clock is ticking as he only has until May 12 – a mandatory five weeks and one day before June 17, the last possible day the election can be held – and this period would be reduced were PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen to call an earlier date.

Here is not a link to endorsing Paludan’s party.


Medieval cemetery most likely populated by those slain in 1534 battle 
A mass grave has been discovered in central Aalborg during work to lay down new sewer pipes, and archaeologists have dated the ten skeletons to 1534. They are confident the medieval cemetery was the site where many local men’s bodies were buried following the storming of Alborg during the ‘Count’s War’ (Grevens Fejde), a three-year civil war that concluded in 1536. “The heads of the skeletons in particular have sustained injuries from sharp weapons such as swords and halberds [a lance with an axe head],” Kenneth Nielsen, an archaeologist at the Northern Jutland Historical Museum, told DR.

Historic buildings face severe fire risk, warns preparedness authority
As a response to the blaze that engulfed Notre Dame last week, the country’s emergency preparedness authority, Danske Beredskaber, has warned that the fire safety of many of Denmark’s historical buildings is poor, and that the country could learn a lot from Norway in this regard. Danske Beredskaber head Bjarne Nigaard urges a national action plan, which would switch responsibility for the buildings from the owners to the state, enabling the introduction of universal, more safety-inclined regulations.

Copyright Act strewn with errors and costing artists, claim researchers
A study of the Danish Copyright Act reveals it is full of errors, reports Politiken. A team of researchers, which included three law professors from the University of Copenhagen’s Faculty of Law, have come to the conclusion that the errors particularly affect how artists should receive money when their works are used by others. Initially, different EU member states were permitted to decide who could and who couldn’t play music for free – most commercial enterprises, such as bars, are required to, for example – but now the EU is insisting that there should be no exemptions. This means that many events run by the state or municipality, which were previously exempt, will have to pay out once the law is redrafted.

S wants to help addicts fined for carrying drugs for personal use
Socialdemokratiet would like to give drug addicts an ID card confirming they are a registered abuser, which they can then present to stop the police searching them. The party argues the addicts should not be fined for carrying drugs that are clearly for their own personal usage. In the area around the two fixing rooms in Vesterbro particularly, where on Istedgade and Halmtorvet drug-users can legally take drugs under proper conditions and supervision, many have complained about police harassment – a problem exacerbated by the presence of the city police’s headquarters in the same block!