Denmark still best at fighting climate change

Third consecutive year leading the way, but still not in first place

Denmark tops the list of countries fighting climate change (photo: Julian Osley) Denmark tops the list of countries fighting climate change (photo: Julian Osley)
December 9th, 2015 8:34 am| by Ray W
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For the third consecutive year, Denmark has topped a list of countries doing the most to combat climate change.

According to rankings compiled by Germanwatch, an independent German NGO, and Climate Action Network Europe, an association of climate NGOs, Denmark finished highest among 58 countries rated according to their climate and energy policy.

No first place
The report stresses that not enough is done to prevent climate change and ensure that the world stays within UN target temperatures, so there is no actual first, second or third place on the ‘The Climate Change Performance Index 2016′. Denmark therefore tops the list by taking fourth place.

This is the third year in a row and the fifth time overall that Denmark has topped the list.

“I am pleased that Germanwatch and climate NGOs from more than 30 countries have designated Denmark for the third year in a row as the country doing most to combat climate change,” said Lars Christian Lilleholt, the energy and climate minister.

“It shows we are well underway with our long-term objective of a society independent of fossil fuels by 2050.”

Not about winners and losers
The report, released yesterday at a news conference at COP21 in Paris, aims to highlight best practice by countries taking the lead in battling climate change and putting pressure on those countries that do not do enough.

“It is not about picking winners and losers, but encouraging more people to pull together and solve climate challenges,” said Lilleholt.

READ MORE: Danish-Cambodian forestry project wins prestigious UN prize at COP21

The report is compiled by 300 experts and assesses the climate and energy policies of the 58 countries worldwide that account for 90 percent of global CO2 emissions.