Flattered by Battersea inclusion: Mother’s pizzas heading for London – The Post

Flattered by Battersea inclusion: Mother’s pizzas heading for London

Danish restaurant to become part of the re-designed Battersea Power Station

The new-look Battersea Power Station (photo: Battersea Power Station Development Company)
February 28th, 2017 3:40 pm| by Christian W
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The Danish restaurant Mother, located in Copenhagen’s Meatpacking District in Vesterbro, has unveiled plans to open a new restaurant in London.

The restaurant has been invited as the only international name among a host of UK companies – including Wright Brothers, D&D, Bens Canteen and Pedler – that will be part of the redevelopment of one of London’s most iconic landmarks, the Battersea Power Station.

Mother restaurant will be located in the railway tunnel that connects Chelsea with Battersea, known as Circus West Village – the first leg of the redevelopment project that is expected to open as early as June 2017.

“For us to be head-hunted to open a ‘Mother’ on such a site in such a town it was a welcome validation for what we have been doing in Copenhagen in recent years,” Mother’s owners Nick Pound and David Biffani, wrote to CPH Post.

“When we realised that we were the only Danish company, or international for that matter, to be operating amongst gold-standard restaurateurs such as D&D and Wright Brothers, well, that made our decision all the easier.”

The restaurant, which last year introduced a new/old technique to prepare its sourdough pizzas using purified seawater, will include indoor and outdoor areas and have a capacity of 170-200 guests.

READ MORE: Danish restaurant turning to Neptune to improve its pizza dough

Energy colossus 
The redesign of the Battersea Power Station – originally built in the early 1930s to meet the UK’s growing energy needs – will be undertaken by the renowned architects Foster + Partners and Gehry Partners.

It was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who was also behind what is now the Tate Modern and was the man who brought the legendary red telephone box to London. It was decommissioned in 1983.

Fans of the classic rock bank Pink Floyd may recognise the building from the cover of their 1977 album ‘Animals’.

(photo: Pink Floyd)