Gang boss to be extradited, Supreme Court rules – The Post

Gang boss to be extradited, Supreme Court rules

The long-running saga surrounding Loyal to Familia’s head has taken another new twist

That’s one less member of the Familia in Denmark (photo: Facebook – LTF CPH)
November 20th, 2018 3:11 pm| by Stephen Gadd
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Shuaib Khan, the 32-year-old leader of the Loyal to Familia gang, is to be extradited for a minimum of six years, the Supreme Court ruled today.

READ ALSO: Government lashes “unreasonable” international conventions in the wake of gang-leader’s sentence

In summing up, the court emphasised that through his criminal behaviour over a number of years the defendant had shown a complete lack of will to integrate into Danish society, DR Nyheder reports.

Although he was born here and has lived in Denmark all his life, Khan holds Pakistani citizenship.

A very bad apple indeed
Khan has spent 10 years of his life in prison already, having been convicted of various crimes including the murder of William Lennon Davis in Aalborg in 2007.

The final straw was a conviction for threatening a police officer in connection with a ‘stop and search’ operation in Nørrebro’s Blågårds Plads.

READ ALSO: LTF gang-member to be deported after high court ruling

Up until now, in the lower courts Khan’s lawyers had successfully argued that extradition would be in violation of international law – among other things because Khan had no connection to Pakistan.

Pakistan not so alien after all
But the prosecution was able to show the court that during a raid police found a Pakistani identity card in the defendant’s name that was issued on 30 November 2017 and valid until 13 November 2027.

There was also an address given at property owned by Khan’s father and it was established the ID card would allow him to enter the country without a visa, reports Ekstra Bladet.

In light of this, the Supreme Court decided that Khan should be expelled from Denmark for six years.

The Loyal to Familia gang is also subject to a legal ban, and the court will decide in the New Year whether this should be rescinded or made permanent.