Meteorite landing site located in Greater Copenhagen area

The main meteorite has been found in shards in Herlev, with another piece found in Ejby.

Unfortunately, the meteorite hasn't been recorded on camera directly. (photo: iStock) Unfortunately, the meteorite hasn't been recorded on camera directly. (photo: iStock)
February 9th, 2016 2:21 pm| by Daniel Deleuran
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The Natural History Museum has established that the meteorite that hit Denmark last Saturday evening, which was seen and heard by hundreds of eye-witnesses across Zealand, landed in a private parking lot in Herlev, a suburb of Greater Copenhagen.

READ MORE: Meteorite hits Denmark

A team from the museum has already recovered a number of fragments, which were initially mistaken for smashed concrete by a mason working at the lot, René Rasmussen.

According to DR, it was only when Rasmussen found a large black-crusted piece that he realised it might be part of the meteorite and contacted the museum.

So far the team has found fragments totalling 500 grams, and it is believed that another half a kilo’s worth has been found in the local area – in some cases as far away as Ejby.

A representative from the museum has publicly stated that they are still keen to track down more pieces and are willing to pay for them.

While several surveillance cameras recorded significant light changes connected to the meteorite, none were actually caught on camera directly.