More content headed for Danish Netflix users

Streaming service eyeing global rights and original content

Getting tired of watching the same three series? There's good news ahead (photo: iStock) Getting tired of watching the same three series? There's good news ahead (photo: iStock)
May 18th, 2015 9:24 am| by Christian W
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Netflix users in Denmark can look forward to having access to more content after the popular streaming service announced it would only negotiate for global rights in the future.

As it currently stands, Netflix users in Denmark have been forced to pay more for less compared to other countries due to the lack of content available because of differences between regional licensing rights.

“We don’t have regional buying teams any more. In negotiations with studios, Netflix is asking for global rights or we’re not interested at all,” Ted Sarandos, the chief content officer with Netflix, told Variety.

READ MORE: Netflix success marred by poor subtitles, high cost and limited stock

More original content
Sarandos also revealed that the streaming service would increasingly invest in its own production of original content.

Last year, Netflix spent 22 billion kroner producing TV series such as ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Orange Is The New Black’, as well as films and documentaries. Next year, Netflix is expected to unveil 48 original films and TV series.

“Right now, our original programming spend has been more efficient dollar for dollar. On the original content programming side, our appetite has only grown,” Sarandos said.

Netflix intends to expand to about 200 countries by the end of 2016.

Last year, Netflix customers in the US enjoyed four times more material than their Danish counterparts. Netflix in Denmark offers 1,962 titles while in the US there are 7,855 titles to choose from.

Meanwhile, Danish Netflix customers have had to pay a much higher fee (79 kroner per month) compared to US customers, who pay the equivalent of about 50 kroner a month.

It is possible that Netflix might target more BBC productions. The broadcaster confirmed last week that it is closing its BBC iPlayer (Global) service on June 26, with a view to “launching new digital services across multiple devices” because its global iPlayer wasn’t “commercially viable in its current form“.

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