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Living in an Expat World | It's just sad ...


Belgium’s Tiny Maerschalk, who has worked for the International Community networking platform since its foundation in 2008, knows how it feels to settle in a new country. Dedicated to improving conditions for new arrivals, here she shares her insights about the business business issues that mean most to internationals in Denmark.

August 24, 2014
07:00

by Tiny Maerschalk


The debate on immigration has flared up again. In July, Inger Støjberg of Venstre wrote an editorial stating that tougher requirements for entering Denmark are needed for certain nationalities and religious backgrounds.

At the same time, it is suggested that it be easier to obtain a residence permit for those who have traditionally shown the ability and will to integrate into Danish society.

Now I wonder – and so do many companies – how can nationality or religious background can be put over professionalism and 
talent?

This debate is detrimental to internationals living here. Why would an international stay and contribute to a society that does not want him?

The debate damages Denmark’s image abroad and makes it difficult for companies to attract the employees they need. 

Wake up Denmark!
Denmark needs qualified labour and talent to ensure the welfare state. Regardless of nationality and religion. However, it seems that Denmark doesn’t get that.

The debate is still based on a differentiation of nationalities and religion. However, talent does not limit itself by nationality or religious background. 

Having a differentiation of requirements based upon nationality or religious background only limits companies in their hunt for the most talented.

In today’s globalised world, many Danish companies depend on international talents.

Having regulations limiting their recruitment will only have a negative effect on economic growth and the welfare state as a whole.

Puzzling and paradoxical
It is simply baffling that there still are politicians who have not realised that Denmark is part of a globalised world where companies value professionalism and talent over nationality and religion.

It is also paradoxical that a liberal politician suggests that we streamline our workforce by making it easier to recruit talents from countries resembling Denmark.

Instead, we should open up to and make room for employees from all parts of the world in order to embrace innovation and improve conditions for growth. 

Over the years, I have followed the debate on immigration and the negative approach saddens me time after time.

It is time for Denmark to start looking forward rather than clinging to the experiences and failed immigration policies of the past.



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