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News in Brief: Across the (ultra)sound


Increasing number of Norwegian women are getting ultrasounds in Denmark (photo: Colourbox)

August 28, 2014
10:27

by The Copenhagen Post


Across the (ultra) sound
An ultrasound clinic in Copenhagen estimates that around 300 pregnant Norwegian women visit every year to get a scan to detect if their foetus will have Down’s Syndrome – a service that is not offered in their homeland. The women express frustration that the test is not available in Norway.

Criticism of ransom payment
The English right-wing media has voiced criticism of the 15 million kroner ransom paid in June to Islamic State for the release of Danish national Daniel Rye Ottosen, who had been held for 13 months. Paying ransoms to terrorists is illegal according to US law, but that has not stopped the citizens of several European countries, including Denmark, doing so.  It is unclear whether any of the governments have contributed, but several have helped with negotiations – something the British and American governments steadfastly refuse to do. Ottosen, who is now heavily in debt, passed on a letter from murdered US journalist James Foley to his family, which he had memorised by heart.

Gang turnover rate high
Despite their reputation for being difficult to leave, the turnover rate at gangs is high, according to a report from the Justice Ministry. Most members do not stay much longer than three years, and every third member leaves on their own, even though they are often coerced or threatened by the gang in an effort to keep them.

‘Ghetto schools’ improving
The number of schools with high concentrations of bilingual students is dropping. Eight of the nine schools identified in a Jyllands Posten survey have managed to reduce their numbers as part of the government’s initiative to alter the composition of schools to improve student performance by spreading out bilingual students.

Decomposing civilization
Rapid climate change is threatening to destroy the remains of some of the first Greenlandic people. Preserved under a permafrost layer for over 4,000 years, the remains could thaw and decompose before they can be excavated, thus denying archaeologists a window into the past civilizations of Greenland. 

 

 

 



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Latest Comments

That was adorable!

(Line Dalsgaard on October 25, 2014 20:19)

Canadians Against Islamic State (CAIS) is a group of concerned Canadians...

(Christopher Friis on October 25, 2014 20:08)

We have had no warming in 18 years. According to the Intergovernmental Panel...

(Brenda Dave Lewis on October 25, 2014 19:53)

Lock them up

(Roger Edwards on October 25, 2014 19:38)

In those golod old days Poles seasonally came to Denmark to help bring-in the...

(Bill Jones on October 25, 2014 18:43)

For many years it's been illegal to cut off a dog's tail for any reason what...

(Jens Rost on October 25, 2014 18:42)

No long sentences? What nationality? Might as well say we are sacred...

(Alex DeGre?t on October 24, 2014 20:42)

You should visit the small cities in the countryside of Denmark, that's where...

(Holger Govertz Hannelius Jensen on October 24, 2014 13:52)

In a country of 5M a show about baking cakes had on average 1M viewers?! Then...

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I'm sorry I'm Italian, I know if an immigrant is found by the police in any...

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