Planned new railway timetable will hit coastal line hard – The Post

Planned new railway timetable will hit coastal line hard

If the plans go ahead, expect fewer trains running on the coastal line and to have to change trains if you want to go to the airport or Sweden

As well as fewer trains, the trains crossing Øresund will be split up (photo: Jorchr)
March 9th, 2018 10:40 am| by Stephen Gadd
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Commuters and municipal officials are up in arms against plans to change train services on the popular coastal railway line Kystbanen from every 20 minutes to every 30 minutes outside the morning and evening rush hours.

Every year, the line plays host to 10 million passengers.

These timetable changes are part of a wide-ranging government railway traffic scheme that began in 2017 and will extend until 2032.

Additionally, it is planned to extend the coastal line service across the Øresund, which means passengers from north Zealand will have to change trains at Nørreport or Copenhagen’s main station if they want to continue to the airport or on to Sweden.

More private cars on the roads
“It is common knowledge that when you have to change trains, fewer people are interested. Instead, train travellers will start using the motorways, which are already crowded enough,” Michael Randdrop, a spokesperson for Kystbanen’s commuters, told DR P4 København.

A number of the municipalities along the route are also extremely critical of the plan.

“This is yet another setback for us. If you want people to use public transport, then the plans are completely unacceptable,” said Fredensborg’s mayor, Thomas Lykke Pedersen.

“Of course it is essential that our commuters can get into Copenhagen and the consequences will be that more people use private cars,” added Morten Slotved, the mayor of Hørsholm.

A hearing is taking place at the moment regarding the plans.

Helsingør, Gentofte and Rudersdal municipalities have sent documentation to the hearing, as have transport company Movia, the Capital Region and the council for sustainable traffic.

All in all, 89 submissions have been received from all over the country. The plan is due to come into force in time for this summer.