Swedish border control costing Øresund region big time

Ongoing saga could end up costing region 1.2 billion kroner a year

When will the sun set on the border control? (photo: iStock)
April 11th, 2016 10:29 am| by Christian W
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Denmark’s ongoing border control saga with Sweden is more than an annoyance for commuters and tourists trying to move between the two countries. It’s downright expensive.

According to a new report from the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Southern Sweden (CCISS), the border ordeal, which is in its fourth month, could end up costing society 1.2 billion kroner a year.

“We hear three things from our employees: the first is about how difficult it is for employees to travel back and forth,” said Per Tryding, the deputy head of CCISS, told News Øresund.

“The second is that it gives an odd impression to guests. Some members have seen strong reactions from visitors who experience being profiled at the border control because they are not blonde. The third thing is that many people worry about long-term investment in the region.”

Tryding recently presented the report to the Swedish government during a meeting regarding border challenges.

READ MORE: Sweden extends border control again

Looking for answers
These challenges include a lack of clarity. The information centre Øresunddirekt is forced to answer questions regarding the border control on a daily basis.

“Many people want to know what ID to take. We have a page on our website that goes into depth on the issue. People have a difficult time finding information about what is required by the responsible authority,” Sandra Forsén, the head of operations for Øresunddirekt, told News Øresund.

Forsén said that Øresunddirekt has been contact with a number of people who have given up their jobs in Denmark because of the ID and border controls.

“People want answers from the politicians so they can ascertain what’s going to happen. If it’s just six months, maybe they can wait it out, but if it keeps going for two or three years, then it’s different.”