Venstre: Danish police should publish exact locations of their speed controls – The Post

Venstre: Danish police should publish exact locations of their speed controls

The party believes motorists will be motivated to respect speed limits more

Speed limits in Denmark are 50 km/h in towns, 80 km/h outside towns and 130 km/h on motorways (photo: Tomasz Sienicki)
April 22nd, 2015 3:00 pm| by Lucie Rychla
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Venstre proposes the Danish police should inform motorists in advance when and where they are conducting traffic speed controls.

The party believes making the speed radars’ locations public would motivate motorists to respect speed limits more.

According to Venstre’s spokesperson for legal issues, Karsten Lauritzen, Danes should be able to go to the police homepage politi.dk and check where the next road speed-limit controls are taking place.

Motorists would respect speed limits more
Additionally, the party wants the police to place warning signs along the roads to make it obvious where the cars with speed cameras are parked.

Venstre admits these measures would probably decrease the revenue from speeding fines.

Unexpected support from SF
Both Liberal Alliance and Dansk Folkeparti have backed Venstre’s proposal.

The party also received unexpected support from their usual opponents, the Socialistisk Folkeparti (SF), who agree the proposal could have a preventative effect, motivating motorists to drive slowly.

SF, however, suggests the police should not reveal their exact locations but only indicate a region, a city or a longer stretch of a road where the speed controls are present.

The police, it said, should be able to carry out unannounced speed controls as well.

Government party not in favour
Socialdemokraterne objects to the idea, claiming that politicians should not interfere in how the police manage their own speed controls.

“The police can best assess whether it would be better to announce where the speed cameras are located or if they should keep it to themselves,” Trine Bramsen, the spokeperson for legal issues, told DR.