More nuclear power flowing through Danish outlets

Although Denmark does not operate a single atomic plant, 14 percent of DONG’s energy supply comes from nuclear power

September 3rd, 2013 4:20 pm| by admin
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An analysis of the national electricity distribution in the last three years shows an unexpected tendency at Denmark’s largest energy company, DONG. 

 

The amount of electricity generated from nuclear power has doubled between 2011 and 2012, even though Denmark does not operate a single nuclear plant. 

 

The analysis, made by Energinet.dk, showed that 14 percent of DONG's energy distribution came from nuclear plants in 2012, compared to seven percent in 2011and just one percent in 2010. Wind energy declined during the same period.

 

Nuclear power comes from Sweden 

So, why is more Danish energy coming from nuclear power when the country operates no plants?

 

"I understand why it may seem illogical,” Louise Hahn, the head of the private consumer department at DONG, told Politiken newspaper.

 

She explained that Danish energy imports from Sweden rose by 75 percent in 2012.

 

“This year a great surplus of hydro-electric power has lowered energy prices in Sweden and Norway. That is why we import from those countries and export our own wind energy to Germany,” Hahn said.

 

Since Sweden generates more than 40 percent of its electricity from nuclear power plants, most of what is being imported to Denmark has been nuclear energy. 

 

A question of supply and demand

Every day, DONG and the other Nordic power companies place an order through the energy market Nord Pool.

 

The companies request the amount of energy they need for the next 24 hours and Nord Pool then matches the demand with its supplies, but buyers cannot choose what kind of energy they prefer.

 

Greenpeace: Fight nuclear power in Sweden

Tarjei Haaland, the climate and energy spokesperson for Greenpeace Denmark, is dissatisfied that such a large amount of Swedish nuclear energy finds it way through Danish power sockets.

 

In 1974, he was one of the founders of the anti-nuclear power organisation OOA.

 

“If you are against nuclear energy, it is not enough to fight it in Denmark alone," Haaland told Politiken newspaper. "We are struggling to end nuclear power in Sweden and curb the development in Finland.”

 

In 1985, a majority in parliament voted against the production of nuclear power in Denmark.

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