Denmark dismantles last cluster bombs

The total destruction of the stockpile cost the state 17.5 million kroner

March 20th, 2014 4:41 pm| by admin

Denmark has dismantled the rest of its cluster bomb stockpile several years ahead of schedule, thus sending a strong signal to the rest of the world.

The deadline for the destruction of Denmark’s national cluster bomb munitions stockpile was actually not until 2018 as per the UN-run Convention on Cluster Munitions, and the foreign minister, Martin Lidegaard (R), is pleased that the Scandinavian nation is showing the way.

“It sends a strong signal that Denmark has now destroyed our entire operational stockpile of cluster munitions,” Lidegaard said in a press release. “Cluster bombs are inhumane weapons that all countries should abolish as soon as possible.”

Lidegaard went on to say that he hoped that all states had joined the Convention on Cluster Munition in order to ensure a total and global ban.

Sarah Blakemore, the head Cluster Munition Coalition, which represents humanitarian organisations in 90 countries, expressed her delight following the news.

“That Denmark has completed the destruction of its cluster bomb stockpile is a milestone in the global battle against this terrible and forbidden weapon,” Blakemore said.

“We urge all nations to follow Denmark’s example and ensure that all cluster bomb stockpiles are taken out of commission and never used again.”

READ MORE: Ban on investment in "indiscriminate weapons" proposed 

Deadly decades later
The cluster bomb ejects up to 200 smaller explosive charges that are designed to kill personnel and destroy vehicles, but because the released smaller bombs are scattered over a wide area, they are a high risk to civilians, especially in populated areas.

Because the smaller explosive charges can remain active many years after being dropped and are about the size of a can of soft drink, children are able to pick them up and detonate them.

The Danish cluster bomb stockpile had included about 42,000 bombs containing around 2.5 million smaller explosive charges. The total destruction of the stockpile cost the state 17.5 million kroner.

The convention permits nations to keep a limited number of cluster bomb munitions and explosive charges for educational purposes, and the Danish Defence has kept about 3,600 charges in order to maintain its expertise in mine and explosive clearing.

It'll be oyster and mussel heaven at Torvehallerne on Friday morning (photo: MorsMobil)
Limfjorden’s first oyster harvest ready for seasonal kick-off
When the oyster season kicks off across Denmark this month, shellfish lover...
The six million kroner table (photo: Phillips)
Danish table breaks world auction house record
A dining table by the Danish designer Peder Moos has broken the world aucti...
It's not the first lion dissection Odense Zoo has been involved in (photo: Odense Zoo)
Odense Zoo preparing for another lion dissection
If you don't have any plans for the autumn holidays this year, you can alwa...
The cost of a ticket to the US could be lost under the sofa cushions (photo: Russell Lee)
Norwegian boss promises ultra-cheap fare to the US
Bjørn Kjos, the head of low-cost airline Norwegian, has revealed he has a ...
Car prices could start going up across the board (photo:  Tesla)
Prices for cars could be on the rise
Denmark is already one of the most expensive nations in the world to own a ...
Astrid Krag is hoping for a compromise on tougher citizenship laws (photo: Mogens Engelund)
Government wants to make it harder for kids with foreign parents to become a citizen
Although the government has already reached a consensus on tightening the r...