City sued in runaway lorry death

“Uncle Carl” was crushed by the vehicle while shopping for gifts for his family

October 12th, 2012 2:16 pm| by admin
facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

The family of Carl Robinson, the 63-year-old American tourist who was crushed to death in August by a malfunctioning garbage lorry on Copenhagen’s Strøget pedestrian street has sued the city.

“I have sent a letter asking the city of Copenhagen to acknowledge responsibility for the accident,” the family's lawyer in Denmark, Søren Kroer told Ekstra Bladet newspaper. “I expect them to quickly acknowledge responsibility so we can begin estimating the amount of damages.”

A representative for the city acknowledged that the letter had been recieved and that the city would shoulder its responsibility for the incident.

Recently retired, Robinson was planning on spending more time with family and travelling“We have said told them over the telephone that we recognised our liability,” said Martin Nordrup Andersen, of Copenhagen’s public works department. “Our responsibility is spelled out in the traffic laws.”

The accident occurred after a city sanitation worker parked and left the vehicle unattended while on his rounds emptying rubbish bins on Strøget. An inspector reported that a sensor in the driver's seat that disengages the vehicle's motor when it is unoccupied may have malfunctioned and caused the vehicle to accelerate.

Mark Scurti, a long-time friend from Robinson's hometown of Baltimore, Maryland, said people are still in shock over Robinson's sudden and bizarre death.

"Over 100 people attended Carl's memorial service and shared stories about his life and how he touched so many people," said Scurti. " People came from all parts of his life, from his childhood days through his later years. Having recently retired, he was looking forward to spending more time with his friends and traveling to see more of the world."

Robinson was hit and dragged several meters before the vehicle stopped when it hit a wall.

Danish beef heading back to Japanese shelves (photo: iStock)
Japan opening its doors to Danish beef again
For the first time in 15 years, Danish food exporters will be able to sell ...
It is just the second time in its five-year history that the C20 has fallen by more than 4 percent (photo: iStock)
C20 Cap-Index in historic tumble
The Danish C20 Cap-Index yesterday recorded its largest ever one-day drop, ...
Number of drink driving young Danes has halved in just five years (photo: iStock)
Far fewer drink-driving accidents involving young Danes
The number of young Danes under the age of 25 who are injured or convicted ...
Cool winds blow down from the Tuscan hills to relieve the precious grapes (photo: iStock)
The verdict on this vintner is in the vitality of his vines
Located close to Montalcino in southern Tuscany, the small boutique winery ...
Denmark's corn (photo: Mogens Engelund)
Life without it would pull the rug out from under the entire nation
You don’t need to know much about this country to know there are three th...
There's nothing like that feeling when you're boarding a ferry in your car, say disappointed users of the Harwich-Esbjerg service (photo: 
Emran Kassim
)
Bring back the Harwich-Esbjerg ferry! But is it really worth it?
George Moore, a 14-year-old Brit based in the English Midlands, has for ove...