Search for Virum murder weapon intensifies as police look for suspect’s DNA

Bushes are cut down and sewage systems are cleared in suburban neighbourhood as police look for further clues in stabbing death

November 21st, 2012 4:25 pm| by admin

Police in suburban Copenhagen are still searching for the weapon used in the fatal stabbing of 41-year-old teacher Heidi Abildskov in her home last week. 

“Our primary goal is to find the murder weapon,” Svendsen told Politiken newspaper. “Once we do, there’s a good chance we’ll be able to find DNA prints on it. But it’ll be a long process.”

Evidence collected by the police suggests that the killer tried to break into the victim’s car after the attack, but was unable to escape with it.

“We are calling on any witnesses who may have seen someone struggling with the car outside the house,” Svendsen told news broadcaster TV2 News. “The car was broken into but obviously not used. Maybe he couldn’t find the keys.”

In addition, Monday's autopsy showed bruising on the victim’s hands and forearms, indicating she had struggled with her attacker. This has led the police to believe that Abildskov may have surprised an intruder, and that she was killed in the ensuing confrontation.

“We can now say with confidence that she was stabbed in the kitchen, where there are visible signs of a struggle,” Svendsen told Ekstra Bladet Newspaper. “So there’s a good chance that the perpetrator was injured in the process.”

Abildskov’s body is currently being examined for traces of her killer's DNA. Police hope she may have scratched at the intruder during the altercation.

There is no sign of a break-in, which has led to the theory that Abildskov may have known her murderer.

The time of death is said to have occurred after 10:15pm on Thursday night. Abildskov had been out with a friend earlier that night and sent a text message to her boyfriend at that time. It was the last time anyone heard from her.

Abildskov was found in her garden on Friday morning, wearing her pyjamas with several stab wounds to her upper body.

Vilhelm Hammershøi at home, trying to smile for the camera (photo: Det Kongelige Bibliotek)
The establishment found him weird, today he is universally revered
In 19th century Copenhagen, the respected art critic Karl Madsen called the...
This smile could keep you out of work (photo: ADA)
Dental doldrums in Denmark: Bad teeth costs jobs
Bad teeth can determine whether a person trying to get off social assistanc...
This government panphlet is a no-no at polling places (photo: Social and Interior Ministry)
Electoral law prohibits the distribution of government EU pamphlets at polling stations
An official government pamphlet about the referendum on the EU justice opt-...
More and more fields are being planted with canola (photo: : Myrabella)
Grain harvest the best for six years
This year’s combined harvest of different types of grain has exceeded 10 ...
New options to reach one of Norway's most picturesque cities (photo: Giuseppe Milo)
Norwegian Air to open Copenhagen to Stavanger route
Starting this summer, Norwegian Air will be flying in and out of Copenhagen...
The numbers and the costs continue to rise (photo: Timothaus)
Cost of refugees skyrocketing in Denmark
The expenses incurred in handling asylum-seekers in Denmark have doubled to...