Rich people break more traffic laws, statistics show

Three percent of the ‘upper class’ and 1.8 percent of the ‘lower class’ have been convicted of traffic violations

October 31st, 2012 2:52 pm| by admin

Members of Denmark’s upper class are far more likely to be charged with a traffic violation than the general population according to a new study by left-leaning economic think-tank AE.

The study is based on data from 1985 to the present and collected in a book about the Danish class society that was published by AE on Monday.

According to the study, 3.6 percent of the upper class has been convicted of a traffic violation, compared with two percent of the upper-middle class and 1.8 percent of the lower class.

The study defines the upper class as managers, self-employed or highly educated individuals with salaries of over 1.2 million kroner a year, while those earning between 800,000 and 1.2 million kroner a year are considered upper-middle class. People with master's degrees or above, regardless of what they earn, are also considered upper-middle class.

The study defines the lower class as people that are not part of the work force for more than 80 percent of the year.

Jonas Schytz Juul, one of the lead authors of the study, argued there were some good explanations for why society’s wealthiest were responsible for the most traffic violations.

“One of the reasons could be that the financial impact of getting caught is less when you are upper class,” Juul told Berlingske newspaper, adding that members of the upper class are also more likely to drive and so get caught breaking the law.

Søren Berg, a traffic consultant for the traffic safety organisation Rådet for Sikker Traffic agreed with Juul’s assessment.

“There is no doubt that the size of a fine can make a difference. A 1,500 kroner fine is a lot of money to some people but not to others. That's why fines for drink driving now reflect the person’s income,” Berg told Berlingske, adding that creating more income-adjusted fines was a possible way of tackling the relatively high levels of traffic violations among the wealthy.

When they arranged to meet in the park, she never thought he'd bring his wife (photo: iStock)
As the Ashley Madison fallout continues, are its members being misunderstood?
Most adultery site users probably never thought they would have to explain ...
Photo by iStock
Referendum in the balance
On 21 August, Danish PM Lars Løkke Rasmussen announced a referendum on rep...
Living life on the move (Photo: iStock)
24 hours in the shoes of a refugee child
Though Denmark’s politicians are increasingly in the news for their hardl...
Per Hansen, Michael Mortensen and Peter Rosengreen represented the management team at the award ceremony (photo: CASA)
Property developer CASA crowned Danish Entrepreneur of the Year
On Thursday evening the audit and consultancy firm EY gathered together 800...
Copenhelp to give a helping hand to Denmark's homeless (photo: iStock)
New app to help homeless in Copenhagen
A new app that aims to lend a helping hand to the homeless in Copenhagen ha...
One has to look good in surgery (photo: iStock)
Copenhagen-based heart surgeon avoids prison time for embezzling research funds
Disgraced heart surgeon Peer Grande, 64, has today been handed a 18-month s...