UPDATE: Rømø bomb scare was false alarm

Police evacuated parts of Rømø after what was thought to be a bomb was uncovered during excavation work

Processing the loss of their loved ones (photo: iStock)
May 8th, 2012 9:36 am| by admin
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UPDATE, MAY 8, 9:36: Yesterday's bomb scare on the island of Rømø turned out to be a false alarm. What was originally thought to be a bomb turned out not to include any explosive materials. Authorities now believe it may be a pressure tank from an airplane. Residents and tourists on Røsø were evacuated from the area for a total of seven hours.

ORIGINAL, MAY 7, 14:38: Authorities in south Jutland evacuated a large area on Rømø island, off the west coast of Jutland near the German border, after a bomb was dug up.

The army’s munitions clearing service, EOD, was immediately called to the scene and there are currently minesweepers on site to examine the bomb, which probably stems from the Second World War.

“We are awaiting orders from them,” police spokeswoman Helle Lundberg said.

Initially, everyone in the area of Lakolk, including the beach, were asked to vacate the area.

But now the evacuation zone has been expanded to cover all of Lakolk, from Strandby in the north to the road Småfolksvej in the south.

”Geographically, it is a large area, so the evacuation we have initiated is considerable,” Lundberg said.

People are also being warned by sirens in the area and police estimate that people will be unable to return to the area until some time later today.

The police are not able to say how many people will have to vacate the premises, which is a well known summer holiday residence area.

“Because the evacuation zone is in a summerhouse neighborhood, we don’t know how may people are currently in the area,” Lundberg said.

The evacuated will be offered refuge at Rømø School in Havneby, where an evacuation centre has been established.

Additionally, the police have advised people to say indoors, which is the safest place if the bomb should detonate, and there is also a no-fly zone over the area.

The police also encourage people to alert others that may be in the danger area.

The uncovered bomb comes just few days after a German WWII airplane was recovered off the coast of Hirsthals in northern Jutland.

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