Danish HIV research garnering international attention

Small study shows great promise, say researchers

The Malo Seaways was hit by emergency flares over the weekeend (Photo: DFDS)
July 29th, 2014 1:08 pm| by admin
facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

Danish research in the fight against HIV, which some are calling “the first step toward a real treatment” for HIV, has generated international attention among researchers and in the media. 

The study, which included only six patients, seemed to indicate, for the first time, “that drugs can activate HIV in latently infected cells, thereby exposing them to the immune system's deadly force,” according to the medical journal MedPage Today.

The article went on to say that the Aarhus study created a stir among the delegates currently in attendance at an international AIDS conference in Australia. 

The British newspaper the Guardian  called the Aarhus results "one of the great scientific discoveries” presented at the AIDS conference.  

A cure?
Steven Deeks, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, told MedPage Today that activation of the HIV virus has long been considered to be the critical first step towards generating a treatment that will have the capacity to help patients on a global scale.

Researchers involved in the study at Aarhus University Hospital downplayed the results, calling them simply another small step in the fight against HIV. 

"There is still a long way to go and many obstacles to be overcome before we can start talking about a cure for HIV," senior scientist and physician Ole Søgaard Schmeltz from Aarhus University Hospital said in a press release. 

The Danish research team’s results are published – in Danish – in an article in Videnskab.dk.

The Malo Seaways was hit by emergency flares over the weekeend (Photo: DFDS)
DFDS hopes to resume Calais service tomorrow
DFDS Seaways services between Dover and Calais remained suspended today aft...
Noma to take a break in Copenhagen in January (Photo: Antissimo)
Noma to close in Copenhagen for ten weeks
Copenhagen’s Noma will shut down for ten weeks next January so the entire...
More and more turbines could be popping up offshore (Photo: Kim Hansen)
More wind farms could be cropping up near the coast
Wind turbines could be popping up along the coastline like, well, wind turb...
It's a Dogg's life (Photo: Jørund Føreland Pedersen)
Rough weekend for the Dogg
US rapper Snoop Dogg's Scandinavian soiree over the weekend was problemati...
It looks barbaric, but the locals call it tradition (Photo: Erik Christensen)
Danish politicians slammed with protests over pilot whale hunt
The traditional grindadráp - the pilot whale hunt - is underway in the Far...
The attempt was eventually abandoned (photo: dinby.dk)
Today’s date: First drilling for oil
The first ever attempt to drill for oil in Denmark took place 80 years ago ...