Giant waves shock Aarhus beachgoers

Mini-tsunamis from fast ferry bring terror at Den Permanente

The article is written with Syrian refugees, among others, in mind (photo: iStock)
July 31st, 2014 11:58 am| by admin
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Beach lovers can usually relax on the Danish shores without having to worry about any dangers such as tsunamis, unless they pick Den Permanente beach in Aarhus.

Århus Stiftstidende reports that giant 'mini-tsunami' waves wash 30 metres up on the otherwise calm beach when a fast Mols-Linien catamaran ferry leaves the Aarhus port close by, causing panic among the unsuspecting beach guests.

No warning signs
Ingrid Sejerøe-Olsen visited Den Permanente on Tuesday when the terror wave struck the beach.

"The first wave totally surprised everyone. I think it flooded a third of the beach. I remember a little boy who panicked. He wouldn't stop crying even in his father's arms," she told Århus Stiftstidende.

She wondered why there were no signs warning of the dangerous tides.

It was the second time in July that a wave flooded Den Permanente. The first time it happened was on 16 July, but because the 'mini-tsunamis' are impossible to predict, the lifeguard didn't find it necessary to put up warning signs.

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