Danish scientists unlock the mysteries of the past

New research demonstrates that proteins can show how individuals lived and died in the past

Hugger's promising career ended in 2009 when he endured a serious eye injury (photo: iStock)
March 24th, 2014 3:36 pm| by admin
facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

New research has begun to unlock how our ancestors actually lived, what illnesses they suffered from, and how they died by analysing proteins found in their bodies, according to the scientific magazine Videnskab.dk.

Lung infection in mummy
By studying the building blocks of life, researcher Enrico Capello and his colleagues from the country’s natural history museum, Statens Naturhistoriske Museum, have been able to determine the illnesses of people and animals.

The researchers have, for example, been able to determine the antibiotic resistance of humans 1,000 years ago by analysing the proteins found in a 1,000-year-old mummified corpse's plaque residue. Likewise, in another study cited by Videnskab.dk, proteins were studied to show that a subject suffered from a serious lung infection at the time of death.

More research needed
However, the Danish researchers are not yet able to identify a lot of the illnesses and infections. To do so, they would first need to measure the number of proteins. As thing stand, they are only able to detect their presence.  

An old school problem could soon be on the way out (photo: Kai Hendry)
Annoying SIM card on the way out
The days of fumbling about to get a SIM card into your mobile phone may soo...
Hugger's promising career ended in 2009 when he endured a serious eye injury (photo: iStock)
Danish boxer Anders Hugger Nielsen found dead
A former professional boxer, Anders Hugger Nielsen, 34, was found dead on S...
For children to learn something, the teacher's authority is essential, believes an expert (photo: iStock)
Danish parents admit their children don’t respect teachers
Children must respect their teachers and regard them as an authority in the...
An interesting place to say "I do" (photo: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason)
Taking the nuptial plunge from the bridge
More and more couples are choosing to say “I do” 60 metres in the air o...
Processing the loss of their loved ones (photo: iStock)
New trend in Denmark: living relatives inscribing their names on gravestones
An increasing number of Danes are choosing to have their names inscribed on...
Danes only want to pay for channels they actually watch (photo: iStock)
Most Danes want to pay only for TV channels they watch
A survey carried out for Jyllands-Posten shows that most Danes would choose...