Danes should prepare to be held up in traffic in Germany en route to their Euro vacation spots

Hope for the best but definitely prepare for the worst

Things are not looking good for the million Danes who are hoping to drive through Germany en route to their European vacation spots this summer.

The German motorist organization, ADAC’s 2016 traffic forecast makes for frightening reading and Danes hoping for smooth sailing might just want to prepare for the worst, reports Ekstrabladet.

Bottleneck
ADAC, which continually monitors the traffic situation on German roads, has warned Danes to factor in more time than they think they’re going to need driving through Germany.

“Traffic over the summer will be heavy this year. There are over 500 road work projects currently in progress on major German roads,” said Diana Sprung, from ADAC’s press office.

“This, in conjunction with the high density of cars seen especially from mid-July to mid-August, is why we recommend that you factor in significantly more drive-time than before.”

Border controls and road work
The two main reasons for the situation are the newly introduced border checks, and roadwork on the stretch of highway from the northern part of Autobahn A7 to well past Hamburg .

Some predictions say that the 166 km between Flensburg and Hamburg may take up to eight hours to traverse.

ADAC recommends that Danes avoid traveling on the 16 and 17 of July – weekend traffic will be at its worst then. Other recommendations are to avoid driving during rush hour times and to plan alternative routes over Autobahn A9 instead of Autobahn A7.





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