Tivoli: Summer’s Friday night hang-out?

Denmark’s famed amusement park to kick-off rock line-up on Friday the 13th

Tivoli has released its Fredagsrock (Friday’s rock) line-up, giving music fans a chance to plan their Friday evenings over the spring and summer. Starting Friday April 13, Copenhagen’s most enchanting venue will host a concert every Friday night until September 21.

Made up of mainly Danish acts, Tivoli’s festival features rock, pop, rap and electronic artists. The line-up comprises quite a few well-known acts, including Swedish pop sensations The Cardigans (June 8), Danish rock classics D-A-D (June 1) and Kashmir (June 15) and Aussie stoner-rockers Wolfmother (June 22). Also in the line-up will be last year’s Dansk Melodi Grand Prix winners A Friend in London  (July 13).

The Cardigans will be playing their classic album Gran Turismo in its entirety, making this the perfect opportunity to “Erase and Rewind” (to use one of their song-titles) back to 1998, when the album was released. The band is only playing five other concerts in Europe this year, so Danish fans are well-advised to head to Tivoli.

Popular Danish act The Storm will kick-start the festival, so this is a chance to see the famous duo Johan Wohlert (Mew’s former bassist) and Pernille Rosendahl (Swan Lee’s former singer and X Factor judge) in action.

If Danish pop and rock acts aren’t your thing, the bars at the stage area will serve 10kr beers every Friday from 7-10pm. The price of the concerts is included in the regular entry to Tivoli, unless you enter the venue after 8pm on a Friday evening. In that case, entry costs 135kr, 40kr more than a normal Tivoli ticket.

For more information, visit www.fredagsrock.dk/en/




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