Body of Danish woman turns up in Poland

But while her remains washed ashore in April, Danish police weren’t informed until three months later

On February 10, nearly six months ago, 48 year-old Jeanett Rask Thomas left her family apartment in Nørrebro to run some errands and buy a shawarma. But she never returned home and a massive police search ensued yielding no results.

The Danish police halted their search in March but the mystery of Thomas’s disappearance cleared up after her drowned body washed ashore off the coast of Poland, hundreds of kilometers away. And for the Thomas family, who had feared the worst, it was nice to finally get some closure in the case.

“I don’t really know what to say. We somehow knew that something like that had happened,” her widower Lars Thomas told BT newspaper. “We have also returned to a normal daily routine during the past six months. It’s a relief. My youngest 13 year-old boy told me that ‘now it will be easier, dad’.”

According to the Polish authorities, Thomas drifted ashore on April 1, but the information first reached the Danish police in July, three months later, according to Jens Møller, assistant police inspector of the Copenhagen police.

Aside from her wedding ring, the Polish police have also sent pictures of the deceased woman from which the Danish police could accurately ascertain that the body was indeed that of Thomas.

But why the Polish police took three months to notify the Danish authorities, despite finding her ring with her husband's name on it, Møller couldn’t explain.

“I don’t have a comment to what Polish police do or why. The engraving on the wedding ring was thought to be of a child,” Møller told BT. “They apparently didn’t realise the connection, and if it is due to a different ring culture in Poland, I don’t know.”

The Polish police did not find any signs of a criminal act in the case.



  • Coping in Copenhagen: Børsen, Burgers and layoffs

    Coping in Copenhagen: Børsen, Burgers and layoffs

    Join comedians and writers Abby, Owen and Marius every Friday as they pick through the week’s headlines and swap notes on life in the capital.

  • Iranian Artist Takes Rebels to Aarhus

    Iranian Artist Takes Rebels to Aarhus

    The defiant collective soul of the Iranian women has transcended eras and borders to haunt Aarhus, Denmark where the city’s art museum, ARoS, is presently hosting an exhibition by Iranian artist Soheila Sokhanvari titled “Rebel Rebel.”

  • Traffic jam will increase in the capital area – more time will be wasted

    Traffic jam will increase in the capital area – more time will be wasted

    A new analysis shows that there will be more pressure on the roads in the capital area towards 2035. With six percent more inhabitants, there will be greater strain on trains and on cycle paths in several places in the region

  • “A Brit walks into a bar…”

    “A Brit walks into a bar…”

    Last night, as I was getting ready to perform in a comedy show at Teater Play in Amager alongside the brilliant Conrad Molden, my four-year-old daughter looked up at me and asked, ‘Daddy, why are you ALWAYS going to do comedy?’

  • Palads’ future will (maybe) be decided tonight

    Palads’ future will (maybe) be decided tonight

    Politicians in Copenhagen will today decide whether Nordisk Film can continue with plans to demolish Palad and build a new building.

  • How to survive Copenhagen as an exchange student

    How to survive Copenhagen as an exchange student

    Studying in a different country is a luxurious opportunity, and Copenhagen is a popular destination. Upon arrival, the realization kicks in that adapting to this new environment may be easier said than done.