Inside this week | Tell me the plot of ‘Notting Hill’

This week sees our last ‘summer holiday’ edition before we return to our regular format, which will see the return of the Food Blog, weekly restaurant reviews, and a lifestyle column that alternates between kids activities, the city’s museums, the Copenhagen underground scene, and Hot Tickets – a head’s up of the headliners coming to town over the next 12 months.

Back this week is our TV review, a regular in the paper for the last five years that also goes into hibernation in July, essentially due to our limited resources, but also due to the tendency of the broadcasters to run repeats or garish outdoor programmes of people enjoying themselves outside, with the insinuation that you should be doing likewise.

I suggested starting the TV review in 2007 within months of starting as a contributor to InOut. There were two main reasons.

Firstly, the Danish newspapers only preview films. This is all very well for somebody who only watches three movies a year, but I don’t need a quick summary of the plot of Notting Hill (yippee, it’s on TV3+ … again). What I do need, though, is to be told about any brand new TV series being broadcast before I decide to watch it – and crucially whether it’s any good.

And secondly, they don’t preview stuff on SV1 and SV2 despite their schedules being packed with new British and American shows and most households getting them for free.

It’s like they’re obeying rules: don’t mention what the foreign media thinks, don’t suggest tuning into a foreign channel – we’re Danish and we will damn well only watch English-language content on our own channels.
Meanwhile, this week sees our first performance dance preview (Two Old Guys and a Relatively Young Man), an area of the arts we regularly cover as it does not require a knowledge of Danish, a free classical music concert at Rosenborg Castle and Pride Week.

And then, it’s a total recall (plus a review of the remake film) of the regular format next week.




  • Huge fire at Novo Nordisk – building “cannot be saved”

    Huge fire at Novo Nordisk – building “cannot be saved”

    A fire broke out at a Novo Nordisk site in Bagsværd on Wednesday morning. There have been no casualties, but the fire is “extensive and spreading”, and Novo’s administrative building “cannot be saved” say emergency services.

  • Digitization is the secret ingredient in Chinese restaurateur’s growth adventure

    Digitization is the secret ingredient in Chinese restaurateur’s growth adventure

    Publisher Jesper Skeel and Korean BBQ restaurant chain owner Zen discuss the ups and downs of independent entrepreneurship and how to crack the Copenhagen market, from both an international and Danish perspective.

  • Pro-Palestinian demonstrations divide Copenhagen society

    Pro-Palestinian demonstrations divide Copenhagen society

    As popular protests of the Israeli offensive in Gaza erupt around the world and in the media, from university campuses to the streets of major cities, discord is escalating between demonstrators, the general public, authorities and politicians.

  • Denmark leads 15 member states in call to outsource EU migration policy

    Denmark leads 15 member states in call to outsource EU migration policy

    Just one day after the EU finally landed its New Pact on Migration and Asylum following four years of tough negotiations, a group of 15 member states, led by Denmark, issued a joint call for greater efforts to outsource migration policy and  prevent migrants from arriving at EU borders in the first place.

  • How to lead Danes IV – Cultural Bypassing

    How to lead Danes IV – Cultural Bypassing

    Many of us Danes, despite being well-educated and well-travelled, often lack experience in navigating cultural differences at work. This can lead to ‘cultural bypassing’, where we believe we are at a level of enlightenment where we no longer are burdened by the risk of making cross-cultural mistakes. As their manager, you can help your Danish colleagues by acknowledging cultural differences in the workplace.

  • Denmark’s Climate Minister wants to expand green agriculture bill

    Denmark’s Climate Minister wants to expand green agriculture bill

    Legislation to cut the sector’s emissions could “kill two birds with one stone” if it also combats fertiliser run-off in Denmark’s marine environment, says Climate Minister Lars Aagard, marking a potential shift in the green negotiations.