Today’s headlines – Friday, Dec 14

Metro neighbours taking noise complaints to Euro courts
A group of Copenhagen residents living close to Metro construction sites is considering complaining to the human rights court in Strasbourg in order to force construction crews to reduce noise levels or to be awarded compensation. A law professor from Aarhus University said it would not be the first time that noise complaint cases end up at the human rights courts. Metroselskabet, the company that operates the Metro, had informed residents earlier this year that construction of the Cityring extension was entering its noisiest phase. While it said it cannot avoid making noise, it said it respected the group’s decision to complain to the court. – MetroXpress

Unions ready to sue over Greenland wage law
Labour groups 3F and LO have announced that they are prepared to complain to the UN should parliament approve changes to Greenlandic law that would allow mining companies operating there to import cheap labour. Citing Greenland’s semi-autonomous status, the government is widely expected to approve the law that would require changes to Danish immigration laws. Danish labour organisations warn that if that happens they will complain to the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the UN organ that oversees international labour standards. Legal experts say unions have a good case, but Greenlandic authorities interpret the ILO conventions as applying to public-sector employees, not those employed in the private sector. – Politiken

More classroom authority for school administrators proposed
High school teachers could wind up losing control over how they organise their workday if the finance minister, Bjarne Corydon (Socialdemokraterne), has his say in upcoming collective bargaining negotiations, according to a report obtained by Berlingske newspaper. The government wants to give secondary-school administrators more responsibility for how much time teachers use to teach and prepare for class. Teachers at state-run high schools and vocational schools use about nine hours a week teaching, which is the lowest in the OECD. Corydon declined to comment on the report, but earlier this month, the government unveiled a similar plan for primary schools. – Berlingske

Handball ladies miss semis despite win
The Danish handball ladies are out of medal contention at the European Championships despite beating group winners Norway 35-33 in their final group match. Denmark’s third straight win over the 2012 Olympic champions meant little because Serbia had beaten France earlier in the day to take second place in the group and the final spot in the semis. Norway finished top of the group with eight points, followed by Serbia with seven points and Denmark with six. Denmark will instead have to play Russia for fifth place, which will not give an automatic bid to next year's World Cup, as Coach Jan Pytlick originally believed. – Ekstrabladet

Weather
Cloudy with some rain and snow. Daytime highs around 0 C. Temperatures falling to -2 C. Winds gusting at times. – DMI




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    Digitization is the secret ingredient in Chinese restaurateur’s growth adventure

    Publisher Jesper Skeel and Korean BBQ restaurant chain owner Zen discuss the ups and downs of independent entrepreneurship and how to crack the Copenhagen market, from both an international and Danish perspective.

  • Pro-Palestinian demonstrations divide Copenhagen society

    Pro-Palestinian demonstrations divide Copenhagen society

    As popular protests of the Israeli offensive in Gaza erupt around the world and in the media, from university campuses to the streets of major cities, discord is escalating between demonstrators, the general public, authorities and politicians.

  • Denmark leads 15 member states in call to outsource EU migration policy

    Denmark leads 15 member states in call to outsource EU migration policy

    Just one day after the EU finally landed its New Pact on Migration and Asylum following four years of tough negotiations, a group of 15 member states, led by Denmark, issued a joint call for greater efforts to outsource migration policy and  prevent migrants from arriving at EU borders in the first place.

  • How to lead Danes IV – Cultural Bypassing

    How to lead Danes IV – Cultural Bypassing

    Many of us Danes, despite being well-educated and well-travelled, often lack experience in navigating cultural differences at work. This can lead to ‘cultural bypassing’, where we believe we are at a level of enlightenment where we no longer are burdened by the risk of making cross-cultural mistakes. As their manager, you can help your Danish colleagues by acknowledging cultural differences in the workplace.

  • Denmark’s Climate Minister wants to expand green agriculture bill

    Denmark’s Climate Minister wants to expand green agriculture bill

    Legislation to cut the sector’s emissions could “kill two birds with one stone” if it also combats fertiliser run-off in Denmark’s marine environment, says Climate Minister Lars Aagard, marking a potential shift in the green negotiations.

  • Dansk Folkeparti threatens to leave Climate Act over CO2 tax on agriculture

    Dansk Folkeparti threatens to leave Climate Act over CO2 tax on agriculture

    Several parties have criticised Dansk Folkeparti’s announcement that it may drop out of Denmark’s ambitious Climate Act agreement, calling the threat populist and cowardly.