Today’s front pages – Tuesday, Feb 12

The Copenhagen Post’s daily digest of what the Danish dailies are reporting on their front pages

Denmark forsaking their Afghan interpreters

The Afghan interpreters who are working for the Danish military in Afghanistan will not be offered protection once Denmark pulls their soldiers out in 2014, according to the defence minister, Nick Hækkerup (Socialdemokraterne). Hækkerup argued that the interpreters are generally hired from calmer parts of the country and that they are not employed by the Danish state, but rather by a private firm. Iraqi interpreters were offered special residency after the Iraq War began in 2003. – Berlingske

Advertised house sizes cannot be trusted

Home buyers in Denmark can never know for sure whether the home they are buying is advertised with the correct size specifications, according to consumer authority Forbrugerrådet. Homeowners measure their residences themselves and report the information to the building registry, Bygnings- og Boligregistret (BBR). BBR’s most recent inspection indicated that there are errors in the reported size of at least 30,000 homes. – Politiken

Foreigners scooping up low-paid jobs

Foreigners are taking over low-paid jobs to a degree that the jobs may never return to Danish hands, according to experts. Figures from Danmarks Statistik indicated that 27 percent of the foreigners working in Denmark earn fewer than 130 kroner an hour, while only 10 percent of Danes earn that amount. The stats encompass all foreign citizens working in Denmark, of whom the largest groups come from Poland, Germany, Lithuania and Sweden. – Jyllands-Posten

Vestas’s reign is over

After 12 years as the world’s biggest wind turbine producer, Vestas finally conceded the top spot to American GE Wind in 2012, according to numbers from the analysis firm BTM Consult. Experts pointed to significant activity on the American turbine market, where GE Wind is strong, and to the fact that GE Wind produced 15 percent of all turbines sold in 2012. The ranking also indicated that Siemens climbed from ninth to third place last year, while second-placed Chinese firm Goldwind dropped out of the top five. – Ingeniøren




  • Denmark warns Russian hybrid attacks likely at major democracy summit

    Denmark warns Russian hybrid attacks likely at major democracy summit

    Experts and authorities say Russian sabotage and cyber attacks are “very likely” at the major Danish politics and democracy summit, Folkemødet, on the Baltic-Sea island of Bornholm this week.

  • Danish government will invest billions and remove burdens for entrepreneurs

    Danish government will invest billions and remove burdens for entrepreneurs

    The government has defined five areas aiming to create a world class environment for entrepreneurs in Denmark: Better access to capital, fewer burdens and less hassle, more talent must be cultivated, more knowledge-based entrepreneurial companies and more entrepreneurs throughout Denmark.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • International inclusion in Copenhagen: Insights from Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard

    International inclusion in Copenhagen: Insights from Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard

    Over 130,000 internationals live in Copenhagen. Here, the city’s Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard outlines how the municipality supports inclusion n the Danish capital.

  • 13 musicians go public on sexism and misconduct in Danish music industry

    13 musicians go public on sexism and misconduct in Danish music industry

    In a new documentary, 13 female musicians share their testimonies of unwanted touching, verbal and text-message harassment, everyday workplace sexism, and exploitation in the Danish music industry. 150 further interviews and several industry studies corroborate their experiences.

  • Late night enigma

    Late night enigma

    After many late recording sessions in Frederiksberg, I often found myself walking down Falkoner Alle at night. I would notice a particular shop front with all its lights on. What was this place?