Biker gangs call a truce

Hells Angels and Bandidos have entered into an agreement, leaders of the gangs confirm

Denmark's two biggest biker gangs, Hells Angels and Bandidos, have come to a new peace agreement.

 

Michael Rosenvold of the Bandidos and Jørn Jønke Nielsen of Hells Angels confirmed to DR News that the two gangs have reached a co-operation agreement, but neither would give any further details.

 

The two biker gangs were in all-out war with one another in the late 1990s before coming to a truce that lasted until 2010, when the then-Bandidos leader Jim Tinndahn ripped up the peace agreement. 

 

According to DR News, the two sides have been working on a replacement to that agreement since autumn 2012 and now they have apparently come to terms. The new deal comes despite the high-profile switch of former Hells Angels member Brian Sandberg to the Bandidos, and an incident in September in which a 17.5 tonne unmanned truck with a brick on the accelerator ploughed into a property used by the Bandidos on Amager. Police at the time suspected that the Hells Angels support group AK81 was behind the attack. 

 

DR reports that the new agreement includes a plan on how to split up gang territory between the two biker groups throughout Denmark. 




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