Nature organisations express their frustration

Diverse group of organisations unite to demand that the government keep its green promises

A broad coalition of environmental and nature-based organisations have joined forces to decry what they see the government's array of broken promises.

Groups as diverse as the nature conservation society, Danmarks Naturfredningsforening (DN) and the national hunters' council, Danmarks Jægerforbund og Friluftsrådet, are united in their frustration at the government’s failure to live up to its green promises.

“They promised an ambitious nature policy, and they have spoken many fine words, but  after two years of being in power we have not yet seen a single concrete decision that will really change the state of nature,” said Ella Maria Bisschop-Larsen, the head of DN. “On the contrary, we have seen the environment take a backseat to the needs of the business economy.”

Also expressing frustration with the government's green course are the fishermen's association Danmarks Sportsfiskerforbund, the bird watching group Dansk Ornitologisk Forening and the animal protection agency Dyrenes Beskyttelse, among others. Bisschop-Larsen said that the support of so many diverse groups reveals just how frustrated those concerned about the environment are with the government.

An uneasy alliance
While DN and hunters might make for strange bedfellows, Claus Lind Christensen, the head of the hunting group, said there is good reason for the groups to work together.

“There is such a great need for a long term nature strategy that we need to forget our biases,” Christensen said.

Polls reveal that it is not only the green groups that are frustrated with governmental foot dragging when it comes to the areas of nature, the environment and the climate. The voters that put them in charge were also expecting more. According to Analysis Danmark, one in four Socialdemokraterne voters, a third of Radikale voters and nearly half of Socialistisk Folkeparti voters are dissatisfied with their party’s green efforts.

READ MORE: Seeds of future nature and agriculture policy sown

The green groups were especially concerned about announcements from several ministers about efforts that will be made to kick start the agricultural sector. They fear that those measures may come at the expense of the environment.

“We are concerned about those announcements,” said Bisschop-Larsen. “Politicians forget that clean water and a healthy environment are prerequisites for our lives and welfare.”




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