A Russian Christmas for Danish Greenpeace activist

Russia is forcing Arctic 30 to stay in the country even though international law allows them to leave until their trial is settled

Greenpeace activist Anne Mie Roer Jensen, the Danish member of the Arctic 30, will have to spend Christmas in St Petersburg after Russia's Investigative Committee ruled that she can't leave the country while awaiting trial.

While Jensen will be forced to remain in St Petersburg, Greenpeace Denmark spokesperson Jon Burgwald said the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS) has ruled that Jensen and the other non-Russian crew members should be allowed to go home.

READ MORE: Danish Greenpeace activist accuses Russia of kidnapping

"ITLOS made it crystal clear that Anne Mie and the 29 other crew members can go home until the case is settled," Burgwald told Politiken newspaper. "We are very displeased with the [Russian] ruling that completely contradicts that."

Jensen was among the 30 Greenpeace activists and freelance journalists who were arrested aboard the Arctic Sunrise and charged with piracy after their failed September 18 attempt to board a Gazprom oil rig in the Arctic Ocean.

READ MORE: Danish Greenpeace activist released on bail

While Russia reportedly dropped the piracy charges, she may still risk getting a seven-year prison sentence for hooliganism. 

Still no trial in sight
The Russian authorities won't say when Jensen's case will be brought to trial. Burgwald called for Denmark to put pressure on Russia to give the activist permission to leave.

"It could take anything from 14 days to two years," Burgwald said, "If we don't put pressure on them, the crew members may be stuck there for years. What Russia is doing right now is against international law and Denmark has to react. It means that they are keeping a Danish citizen prisoner in a foreign country." 




  • Denmark warns Russian hybrid attacks likely at major democracy summit

    Denmark warns Russian hybrid attacks likely at major democracy summit

    Experts and authorities say Russian sabotage and cyber attacks are “very likely” at the major Danish politics and democracy summit, Folkemødet, on the Baltic-Sea island of Bornholm this week.

  • Danish government will invest billions and remove burdens for entrepreneurs

    Danish government will invest billions and remove burdens for entrepreneurs

    The government has defined five areas aiming to create a world class environment for entrepreneurs in Denmark: Better access to capital, fewer burdens and less hassle, more talent must be cultivated, more knowledge-based entrepreneurial companies and more entrepreneurs throughout Denmark.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • International inclusion in Copenhagen: Insights from Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard

    International inclusion in Copenhagen: Insights from Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard

    Over 130,000 internationals live in Copenhagen. Here, the city’s Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard outlines how the municipality supports inclusion n the Danish capital.

  • 13 musicians go public on sexism and misconduct in Danish music industry

    13 musicians go public on sexism and misconduct in Danish music industry

    In a new documentary, 13 female musicians share their testimonies of unwanted touching, verbal and text-message harassment, everyday workplace sexism, and exploitation in the Danish music industry. 150 further interviews and several industry studies corroborate their experiences.

  • Late night enigma

    Late night enigma

    After many late recording sessions in Frederiksberg, I often found myself walking down Falkoner Alle at night. I would notice a particular shop front with all its lights on. What was this place?