Unable to hit goal, emergency phone line changes definition of success

Callers to 1813 will get through within ten minutes … by April

If you can’t hit your goal, why not just change it?

That seems to be the philosophy of Region Hovedstaden, the governing body responsible for the newly-launched – and heavily-criticised – 1813 emergency phone line. 

The stated aim of the call system is for 90 percent of incoming calls to be answered within three minutes. Currently, the phone line is only hitting that goal on around ten percent of calls. 

Following its rocky rollout, Region Hovedstaden now says that the three-minute goal only needs to be achieved by April. 

READ MORE: Emergency phone system continues to flounder

According to public broadcaster DR, a note from a meeting of officials involved in the 1813 project reveals that the three-minute goal has been pushed back by three months. The plan aims to gradually hit the three-minute mark by April. February’s goal is to have 90 percent of calls answered within ten minutes, while March should see the calls answered within five minutes. 

It was reported over the weekend that one out of every four callers either gets disconnected or simply gives up before ever getting through. Some callers reported waiting for over an hour to explain their problem to a nurse, only to endure another hour-long wait before being referred to a doctor.

READ MORE: Disastrous start for new emergency phone line

Supposed to help hospitals
The new phone line is supposed to limit pressure on hospitals by both reducing the number of unnecessary visits by ill or injured residents. Instead of going straight to an A&E, residents must now call 1813 to speak to a doctor or nurse who will assess the resident’s illness or injury.

Residents facing life-threatening emergencies should still dial 112.




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