Also in cinemas | Make your PIX

People in movies are pretty as it is. 

So unless you are a fashionista, there is little need to see the new biopic Yves Saint Laurent, which the Guardian describes as “pure corporate self-endorsment”, if stylishly produced.

The Book Thief, on the other hand, very lawfully acquired its plot from Markus Zusak’s 230-week best-seller of the same name, but whether Brian Percival (Downton Abbey) really managed to transcend the New York Times’ allegation that this is a “shameless piece of Oscar-seeking Holocaust kitsch”, you must see it for yourself, or take your kids along and brand it educational.

But even the types that ‘don’t see the point of spending money when I can see a movie right here at home’ have to admit that CPH:PIX has quite the program for us; try as you might, you’re just not going to convince William Friedkin (The Exorcist, The French Connection) to give a masterclass in your living-room (Sat noon at Dagmar).

And wouldn’t it be nice to watch a movie in your mother tongue and wonder how many nuances the other viewers miss – schadenfreude anyone?

If neither mischievous nor lascivious humour floats your boat, you should probably keep your hands off the dirty German Wetlands (Mon 7pm Cinemeteket), but before you flee to animated movie heaven: Ari Folman’s (Waltz with Bashir) new animated movie The Congress (Fri 9.30pm Park Bio and others) is not exactly easy on the head.

Too artsy-fartsy? Make a pick from the thrills and kills selection. 
Want to be the first? See A Thousand Times Good Night (Sat 7pm Grand & Tue 19:15 Cinemateket) or Fading Gigolo (Sun 9.30pm Grand) before they come out in the cinemas!

Closeted Game of Thrones fan? Hide in the crowd at the open-air screening of the season premiere (Østre Anlæg Park Mon 9.30pm).

Don’t believe Brazil has more to offer than Carnival and football? Why, how about New Brazilian cinema.

There is an international film festival on your doorstep, so take the first and make your PIX.

 




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