Fewer losing their jobs

The number of workers getting fired or laid off is the lowest for seven years

The number of layoffs is at its lowest mark for seven years, fuelling further speculation that the Danish labour market is performing well.

Pink slip figures are at their lowest since 2007, and unemployment overall is holding steady at around 6.5 percent, according to Politiken newspaper.

The numbers are the most optimistic recorded since the beginning of the financial crisis.

"These are good numbers"
“During the first seven months of this year, 3,813 layoffs were reported, a healthy drop from the nearly 6,000 reported by this time last year,” Erik Bjørsted from the labour group Arbejderbevægelsens Erhvervsråd told Politiken.

“You will never see a period of zero job losses, because even when the economy is at its best, businesses still open and close. These are good numbers.”

Still cause for concern
Bjørsted did note that the current slowdown in the overall European economy could have an effect on Denmark.

“The slowdown in Europe is a concern,” he said. “If Europe’s economy does not pick up some momentum in  the coming quarters, that could be a negative factor in the Danish upswing.”

 




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