Traditional school breaks eliminated

To provide more structure and prevent bullying, Danish teachers are now in charge of when and how school breaks take place

At least 17 schools in Denmark have eliminated breaktime, reports DR News.

Teachers now decide when children should take a time-out, and at some schools they control and monitor what children do during the breaks. 

Other schools are considering similar changes.

READ MORE: Recent school reforms old news for CIS

For better structure and safety reasons
Karina Miller, the headteacher at Dragør School, believes it improves children's learning and reduces bullying. 

"Teachers time the breaks as needed and in a way so the day is more coherent," explained Moller to DR News. 

"The pupils experience a school day that is more structured, and they are constantly surrounded by the teachers they know well." 

READ MORE: Danish students do not respect their teachers

School should be fun too
However, Mette With Hagensen, the president of the national association for schools and parents, disagrees and feels children should have some time away from their teachers. 

"Children also need to just play and do what they want – even during a school day," she told DR News.

The Danish association of pupils, meanwhile, finds the cancellation "annoying".

"We lose the opportunity to play and have real breaks," Miranda Wernay Dagsson, the president of the association, told DR.

 




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