New climate report bleak and frightening read

Rising waters scary and problematic prospect for cities and coasts

Denmark will face larger and more frequent flooding and some of Europe’s highest damage costs due to climate change, reports the Ministry of Environment in a press release today.

In a soon-to-be-released report by the ministry on the consequences of a changing climate it states that the country will face a sea rise level of 70-80 centimetres approaching 2100, among other concerns.

This new report marks the first such overview of Denmark’s environmental future. It states that the country will see changes happening at an accelerated pace by the end of the century.

Copenhagen will see a 1.7 metre rise in water levels several times a year, according to the report. And a place like Esbjerg in southwest Jutland will see a rise in water levels of four metres every five years, a rise that should only be seen every 100 years.

What comes next?

“This report may seem scary because it paints a bleak picture of some of the scenarios we will experience,” Kirsten Brosbøl, the environment minister, said. “But when we have to adapt to the changing climate we need to face reality.”

The government has launched a number of initiatives to equip the country against these imminent threats and Denmark will need 2.5 billion kroner more in the municipalities, Brosbøl tells Berlingske.

Copenhagen has plans to build two huge dikes to protect the city from storm surges, reports Jyllands-Posten.

READ MORE: EU agrees on climate targets

Europe also makes changes

Last week at a summit in Brussels EU leaders recognized the continued threat of climate change and reached a deal to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030. The group also agreed to increase the use of renewable energy to 27% and energy efficiency to 27% as well, reports BBC.

Next week over 600 scientists and government representatives from 125 countries will come together in Copenhagen to review the next climate report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to be published in November. The report will help inform and direct future climate policy.

 



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