Government announces “ambitious” climate plan

Pool of 151.9 million kroner set to meet 2020 targets

The government, SF and Enhedslisten have agreed on how to use a pool of over 150 million kroner to stymie the effects of climate change by the end of the decade.

The plan is part of the 2015 budget deal and includes 12 initiatives.

“We are increasing our focus on climate change and we're not sleeping on solutions,” Rasmus Petersen, the minister for climate and energy, said. “The climate change initiatives are an important step in the direction of braking Denmark's emissions.”

READ MORE: Climate minister wants to ban coal by 2025 – five year earlier than planned

Rehabilitating Store Åmose
One of the largest initiatives is to rehabilitate Store Åmose, a large nature conservation area in western Zealand, which has not only unearthed many Stone Age finds, but whose carbon-rich soil is responsible for emitting large amounts of greenhouse gases.

Nearly a third of the pool – 45 million kroner – will be earmarked to restore the area, while preserving its unique cultural and historical artefacts. Though the area is quite large, the initiative would account for restoring an area as large as 400 football fields or 270 hectares.

The environment minister, Kirsten Brosbøl, considers the planned restoration a great success that will be for the “benefit of Danes” who will be able to enjoy the area.

“At the same time, we have found 13 million kroner to plant new forests throughout Denmark,” she said.

READ MORE: Climate deal reached; some issues left unresolved

Transport initiatives
Four of the 12 initiatives will tackle the transportation sector since the road sector accounts for 90 percent of the total transport greenhouse gas emissions.

A total of 27 million kroner has been earmarked for such things as subsidies for electric buses, incentives for businesses who promote green transport and changing requirements for the public procurement of vehicles.




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