New Apple centre in Denmark to create 300 jobs

Computer company opening centre in Jutland

Apple has announced plans to build a data centre in Viborg, mid Jutland. According to the American IT giant, the move will create at least 300 jobs. 

Apple will spend 6.3 billion kroner on setting up the 166,000 sqm centre in the Viborg district of Foulum. Construction work will start in 2017 and is expected to be completed in 2026.

The data centre – along with another announced 6.3 billion kroner centre in Athenry, Ireland – will run Apple's online products for European users, including iTunes, App Store, iMessage, Maps and Siri. 

The overall 12.6 billion kroner outlay will be the largest amount Apple has ever invested in Europe.

Green apples
The locations of the data centres have been determined by environmental concerns. They will run 100 percent on renewable energy.

Viborg was chosen as it is located near one of Denmark’s largest electrical substations, which means additional generators will not be needed. Any excess heat produced by the centre will be fed into the local heating system.

READ MORE: Hearing aid company strikes deal with Apple

How about them apples?
Mogens Jensen, the minister for trade and development co-operation, welcomed the news.

"An investment like this confirms that Denmark has managed to strike the right balance between an ambitious and climate-friendly energy policy and a world-class business environment," he said.

Peder Østermark Andreasen, the CEO of Energinet.dk, applauded the energy sector.

"We're proud that we can make Denmark attractive to a large, international company – one that uses a lot of energy and trusts our electrical grid so much that they are interested in settling down without using backup generators," he told business.dk.




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