Denmark permits Total to reopen fracking site

DEA allows French gas company Total to continue drilling for shale gas in northern Jutland

Danish energy officials confirmed on Tuesday that French gas company Total can continue drilling for shale gas in northern Jutland, lifting a week-long ban on the controversial practice.

The Danish Energy Agency (DEA) ordered an immediate stop to drilling on Wednesday last week, after it emerged that Total had used a chemical, referred to by the Danish media as ‘Null Foam’, which was not approved by the authorities’ environmental impact assessment.

DEA satisfied
The DEA has concluded that drilling will resume once all the necessary permits from the environmental authorities have been obtained.

The DEA noted it had received a “satisfactory” statement from Total in which the company “described how it will ensure that no future error occurs by introducing a number of new procedures to control the handling of chemicals”.

Political resistance continues
The drilling in Vendsyssel in northern Jutland has been met by widespread protests and, more recently, political resistance.

Both Radikale and Socialistisk Folkeparti have declared that they would not give permits to drill for shale gas on Danish soil.

‘Fracking’  is a highly controversial practice that involves drilling down into the earth and directing a high-pressure water mixture into the rock to release the gas inside. Denmark is one of the few countries that still allows the practice, which is banned in a number of countries including France and many states in the US.

The French company was granted approval to explore for shale gas in June last year despite widespread resistance from the local community and various environmental organisations.


 

LOOK OUT for our cover story in this week’s Weekly Post, which hit the streets this morning, in which a group of students from the DIS reveal how the Environment Ministry has steadfastly ignored their warnings regarding the practice of fracking.

 

 




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