Brøndby unveils new coach

Alexander Zorniger brings Bundesliga experience to Vestegnen

Following several months of speculation, Brøndby IF football club have finally put a name to their new coach. And no, it’s not John Terry or Arsenal legend Tony Adams. They went with ‘zee German’ instead.

Alexander Zorniger will assume control of the coaching reins of the Superliga team on June 13 from interim coach Auri Skarbalius, who has held the position following the dramatic departure of Thomas Frank in March.

“Brøndby IF is a club with a big name in Europe due to its history and its many fantastic players, which the club continues to produce year after year,” said Zorniger. “From the Laudrup brothers and Peter Schmeichel to Andreas Christensen and Daniel Wass.”

“There is always pressure on clubs like Brøndby IF, whether you win trophies or not. I know what I can do and what I can offer, and what I stand for is a clear approach to football.”

READ MORE: Brøndby in chaos as Frank calls it quits

German pedigree 
That approach, according to the 48-year-old, includes applying intense pressure on opponents and playing in an aggressive and attacking manner.

Zorniger, who was sacked by just-relegated Bundesliga outfit VfB Stuttgart in November last year, also coached German outfit RB Leipzig from 2012-2015 and was an assistant coach in VfB Stuttgart in 2009. His coaching career also includes spells in lower league teams FC Normannia Gmünd and SG Sonnenhof Großaspach.

The German led RB Leipzig – which just won promotion to the Bundesliga – from the regional divisions to the Second Bundesliga in just two seasons.

In other sports news, Denmark’s tennis darling, Caroline Wozniacki, has been forced to withdraw from the French Open due to an ankle injury.




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