More Danish war veterans seeking help with mental problems

Number of soldiers suffering from PTSD has increased significantly

A growing number of Danish war veterans and their relatives have been reaching out to counselling organisations for help with their psychological problems in the last two months.

In the light of recent tragic events and increased media attention to the problems of soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), more veterans have been calling the lifeline for military employees HKKF Livlinen or using the services of the nonprofit organisation Veteranalliancen.

“In the last few weeks, we have been contacted by several people, because of what happened,” Lisbeth Brixen Nielsen from HKKF Livlinen, told Jyllands-Posten.

“They are troubled and experience uncertainty and anxiety.”

READ MORE: Veterans march for PTSD compensation

Preventable tragic incident
Last week, a 42-year-old war veteran with PTSD, Lars Kragh, was arrested in his car near Horsens in east Jutland with the bodies of his dead parents.

At a court hearing in Randers, Kragh pleaded not guilty but admitted he had hit his parents multiple times with fists and an axe in self-defence.

Kragh suffers from severe mental problems due to his experiences in the Bosnian war.

Later it turned out that his murdered mother had several times asked authorities for help – to no avail.

READ MORE: War veteran confesses to bomb threats

More suffer from PTSD
Rasmus Jarlov, the defence spokesman for Konservative, has called on the defence minister, Peter Christensen, to launch an investigation in that matter.

The number of Danish soldiers, who have been declared unfit for duty because of PTSD or other psychological problems, has increased by 60 percent in the last three years.

The figure does not include thousands of soldiers who have left the army.




  • Denmark warns Russian hybrid attacks likely at major democracy summit

    Denmark warns Russian hybrid attacks likely at major democracy summit

    Experts and authorities say Russian sabotage and cyber attacks are “very likely” at the major Danish politics and democracy summit, Folkemødet, on the Baltic-Sea island of Bornholm this week.

  • Danish government will invest billions and remove burdens for entrepreneurs

    Danish government will invest billions and remove burdens for entrepreneurs

    The government has defined five areas aiming to create a world class environment for entrepreneurs in Denmark: Better access to capital, fewer burdens and less hassle, more talent must be cultivated, more knowledge-based entrepreneurial companies and more entrepreneurs throughout Denmark.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • International inclusion in Copenhagen: Insights from Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard

    International inclusion in Copenhagen: Insights from Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard

    Over 130,000 internationals live in Copenhagen. Here, the city’s Culture and Leisure Mayor Mia Nyegaard outlines how the municipality supports inclusion n the Danish capital.

  • 13 musicians go public on sexism and misconduct in Danish music industry

    13 musicians go public on sexism and misconduct in Danish music industry

    In a new documentary, 13 female musicians share their testimonies of unwanted touching, verbal and text-message harassment, everyday workplace sexism, and exploitation in the Danish music industry. 150 further interviews and several industry studies corroborate their experiences.

  • Late night enigma

    Late night enigma

    After many late recording sessions in Frederiksberg, I often found myself walking down Falkoner Alle at night. I would notice a particular shop front with all its lights on. What was this place?