Move over Tivoli: New massive amusement park coming to Copenhagen

HC Andersen-themed park to be designed by Bjarke Ingels Group

The two popular amusement parks in the Copenhagen area, Tivoli and Bakken, can look forward to some additional competition in the not-too-distant future.

The world-renowned architecture company Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) will design a new HC Andersen-themed amusement park in a 85,000 sqm area in the part of Nordhavn currently being developed.

“It will be a ‘Class A’ amusement park and we’ve obtained ten sketch proposals from Forrec based on HC Andersen’s adventures,” Kurt Immanuel Pedersen, the head of the company behind the plan, told Metroxpress newspaper.

“For instance, it could be a 4D cinema where one can feel the heat and cold and perhaps smell the roast goose from ‘The Little Match Girl’. It could also be a universe from ‘The Tinderbox’, where you encounter the big dogs.”

READ MORE: Danish amusement park among top in Europe

Go BIG or go home
The amusement park’s icon will be the H C Andersen Adventure Tower, which will stand 280 metres tall and become the highest building in the Nordics – three times the height of the Round Tower.

The park, which is estimated to open somewhere between 2025 and 2027, is expected to cost about 6.5 billion kroner.

The first hurdle will be convincing a majority at City Hall to support the project – it will require approval from both the finance committee and the technical and environmental committee.

Pedersen said he had established a good discourse with politicians across the board, although Copenhagen’s deputy mayor for technical and environmental issues, Morten Kabell, reportedly remains sceptical.




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