Just like Oliver Twist said: Copenhagen Dining Week wants some more

Fine dining at affordable prices at more than 50 of the capital’s top restaurants

Most 2020 festivals have been cancelled – concerts, theatre shows, lectures, tastings too.

But not Copenhagen Dining Week (CDW), because from today it is coming back to make it a month’s worth of fine dining at affordable prices.

As the maitre d’ assured Mr Creosote in ‘Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life’: “I will personally make sure you have a double helping.”

Tenth anniversary in style
Not content with bringing delectable cuisine for a snip to the good folk of Copenhagen between February 7 and 16, CDW’s easy concept is available to the public for 14 days from June 15-28 – quite the fashion to celebrate its 10th anniversary!

Simply go to diningweek.dk and reserve a table at the restaurant of your choice. Each meal is three courses and costs 250 kroner per diner (+15 kroner fee). In most cases, it is a strictly set menu with no options.

Over the last decade, an estimated 100,000 diners have eaten at around 200 participating restaurants in 50 cities and towns in Denmark during CDW.

Book fast as it is quickly selling out!
For this special summer edition, some 59 of the capital’s restaurants are taking part, along with an additional 20 in the rest of Zealand, and 10 in Fyn and Jutland.

The reopening is taking place in accordance with the authorities’ coronavirus guidelines, so only a select number of guests are permitted.

You are accordingly best advised to book fast to avoid disappointment as a handful have already sold out.

Book here.




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