Denmark earmarks millions for Ukraine as border tensions rise

The foreign minister yesterday visited the border in the eastern part of the country, where Russian forces are reportedly assembling 

The government has decided to set aside 164 million kroner to help Ukraine boost its defence capability in its border region with Russia. 

The foreign minister, Jeppe Kofod, who visited the border himself yesterday, said he was appalled at how the ongoing situation in the eastern part of the country had manifested itself in the region.

“Ukraine is acutely threatened by the massive and unheard of military build-up by Russia near the Ukrainian border. The government will not sit idly by and watch,” said Kofod.

“Our new aid package is comprehensive and every krone is needed. We are hereby sending a clear signal regarding our solidarity with Ukraine. The Ukrainian people will know that they do not stand alone in their fight for sovereignty and independence.”

READ ALSO: Relations in deep freeze? Denmark thrice condemns Russian actions

Hoping for constructive talks
Kofod’s visit to Ukraine comes a week after a number of NATO and OSCE meetings with Russia relating to the exploration of diplomatic options in de-escalating the situation. 

Denmark remains open to a constructive dialogue with Russia, though it has stressed the military pressure being applied by the Russians is unacceptable.

“Russia’s threatening and aggressive behaviour against Ukraine is completely unacceptable. It is in direct violation of international law and European security treaties that Russia has also signed. It is the Ukrainian people alone who should decide the future of Ukraine,” said Kofod. 

The government also decided to deploy four F-16 fighter jets and the frigate Peter Willemoes to the region to help with NATO tasks in the Baltic and northern European regions. 

It is believed Russia has massed some 100,000 forces on its border with Ukraine.




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