National Round-Up: Restless crowds get ugly outside Tivoli

Who knew that FredagsRock would be this popular!

There were more than few people in the crowd (photo: Tivoli Facebook page)
April 25th, 2022 4:00 pm| by Ben Hamilton
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Who knew everyone wanted to go to a concert so bad! It’s not like the whole city’s been cooped up at home for two whole years climbing up the walls!

Well, certainly not Tivoli, which was blown away by the interest in its concert on Friday: the second of its FredagsRock series – almost literally, but the walls held firm once it decided to close its gates. 

Police called into action
Pandemonium reigned outside Tivoli as huge numbers were told they could not be admitted. 

Many spilled out onto the roads, disrupting transport, while others looked for weak spots to obtain entry, targeting a fence that sustained damage.

The police were required to take action.

At least there were no fights this time
The concert in question, featuring singer Andreas Odbjerg and rapper Artigeardit, was free with entry to Tivoli, so the themepark had no idea how many might attend. The answer was half of Copenhagen. 

Tivoli accordingly intends to take action by using a new booking system, so concert-goers can register their interest ahead of attending.

Meanwhile, at least the concert passed without incident. A week earlier, a performance by the rapper Icekiid was interrupted for several minutes when fights broke out near the stage.


Healthy subsidies to set up electric car charging stations
The AFI Law has come into force, providing municipalities and regions with a better framework for co-financing electric car charging stations. Applications are now welcome for funds from a pool of 100 million kroner to cover 50 percent of all costs. A further 65 million was allocated in March.

Spraying ban aims to protect groundwater from unwelcome pesticides
MPs have backed a spraying ban that will outlaw the use of a fair number of pesticides on public ways, such as paths, roads, pavements and parking areas as well as private driveways and terraces, to prevent toxic substances from finding their way into the groundwater. Glyphosate, which is found in the world’s most widely used pesticide, Roundup, was singled out as being of particular concern. A sales ban will commence next year ahead of a spraying ban from 2024.

Funds for human trafficking action plan confirmed
The government has confirmed a new 118.2 million kroner action plan to combat human trafficking until 2025. Efforts will be made to strengthen government efforts and to ensure better services for victims of human trafficking. The action plan is the sixth since 2002.

Helping Ukrainians to get a bike
Around 1,900 Ukrainians have signed up for the Giv en cykel (give a bike) scheme, and over 750 bicycles have so far been donated to help make the new arrivals mobile. Launched on March 11 thanks to a collaboration between Cyklistforbundet and the Transport Ministry, the public are urged to get involved via givencykel.dk

Green light for double-trailer pilot on motorway
MPs have backed plans for a pilot scheme to test out double-trailers on the motorway running from Aarhus to Høje-Taastrup. Should the pilot be a success, it will enable individual lorries to transport far more goods whilst saving CO2 emissions: an estimated total of 22,000 tonnes per year. Minor adjustments are needed to roads in relation to bends.

Green public transport sector pool approved
MPs have approved a pool of 250 million kroner for the green public transport sector: 50 million a year for the next five years. The main aim is to introduce more green buses. The agreement is part of the 2035 Infrastructure Plan.

Teachers have permission to use English or Ukrainian
MPs have backed plans to allow teachers and daycare workers to deviate from the Folkeskole Law and teach in languages other than Danish for the purpose of Ukrainian children. Teaching in Ukrainian and English will be permitted

Number of pensioners in decline … for six months only though
Last year’s increase in the state pension age from 66 to 66.5 resulted in nobody becoming a pensioner during the first six months of 2021, accordingly lowering the number of pensioners aged 65-69 from  233,100 to 203,400 over the course of the year. Meanwhile, the number on early retirement and senior pension over the age of 65 increased by 7,300. In total, the number of pensioners fell by 15,000 from 1,077,000 to 1,062,000 over the year.

Three under-10s diagnosed with rare hepatitis type
Three children under the age of ten have been hospitalised since the beginning of the year with a rare type of hepatitis, reports Statens Serum Institut. The cause is unknown. While the children were seriously ill, none of the three required a liver transplant. Similar cases have also been seen abroad. 

Fewer cyclists according to report
Fewer people in Denmark are cycling, according to a DTU study conducted last year. Only 15 percent of over-6s regularly cycle, compared to 19 percent in 2016. The findings were presented in conjunction with a Jyllands-Posten report on the amount the government is spending on improving the country’s cycling infrastructure – 3 billion kroner was earmarked in the 2021 budget. The fall in cyclists is blamed on an increase in car owners. 

FLSmidth’s partner accused of tax avoidance
A Danwatch report exposes how Vale, a Brazilian partner of Danish cement producer FLSmidth, is paying less in corporate tax in relation to its coal mine in northwest Mozambique than its employees are contributing in income tax. Located in a suburb of Tete, FLSmidth contributes equipment and maintenance to the mining company’s operations.

Huge interest in green energy tech development
Det Energiteknologiske Udviklings- og Demonstrationsprogram (EUDP), a program that aids the development and demonstration of new green energy technologies in Denmark, received a total of 236 applications for support in 2021 – the highest in its history. EUDP was able to fund 86 of the applications to a total value of 753 million kroner.

Arla piloting project to reduce methane production
Arla and Royal DSM have announced a pilot project in which farmers across three European countries will test the methane-reducing feed additive Bovaer on 10,000 dairy cows. It is believed the usage could reduce methane emissions by around 30 percent. Arla’s current CO2 emission rate for every litre of milk is 1.15 kilos, making it one of the most climate-efficient milk producers in the world.

Museums watching their energy costs
A number of the country’s museums are reducing their consumption of heating and electricity to save costs in light of rising energy bills. Among those that tell DR they’ve been affected are: Museum Vestsjælland, Museum SydøstDanmark and Museum Lolland-Falster along with museums in Kalundborg, Odsherred, Ringsted, Sorø, Slagelse and Holbæk.

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