National Round-Up: Landmark ruling for children conceived using Danish sperm donors

Elsewhere, an acting minister will represent Denmark in the UN climate summit, and CPH Airport has registered its first profit since 2020

If only citizenship was handed out based on being adorable (photo: Pixabay)
November 10th, 2022 4:05 pm| by Loïc Padovani
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An Eastern High Court decision late last week means that children conceived using a Danish sperm donor won’t have right to Danish citizenship.

In its ruling, the court stated that a sperm donor could not be considered to be a father to the child.

The case revolves around a foreign woman who gave birth to a child that was conceived via a Danish sperm donor in 2018.

READ ALSO: More Danish women having donor babies alone

Immigration Ministry backed
She contended that the child should be given Danish citizenship because the law states that a child is entitles to citizenship “if the father, mother or co-mother is Danish”.

But her stance was rejected by the Immigration Ministry at the time and that position has now been backed the High Court.

“It is true that the law text includes ‘father’, but it shouldn’t be taken in the biological sense,” the court concluded.

The court referred to the ‘børneloven’ child law, in which paragraph 28 states that a sperm donor is not considered to be the father to the child.


Jørgensen to represent Denmark at COP27
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CPH Airport reports first profit since 2020
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