Magic roots worth discovering

Its simple name is deceiving – ‘Mozart’ is not just a showcase of the composer’s most well-known works. Rather, the musical, which is currently playing at Betty Nansen Teatret, is a captivating blend of classic Mozart and modern art.

The show begins innocently; the actors, sprawled across the stage, join in together one-by-one to create their own version of Mozart’s ‘Requiem in D Minor’. It’s beautiful, but only an introduction to the creativity and absolute eccentricity of what is to come. For example, over the course of the show, a single stream of water mysteriously leaks from the ceiling and gains force as the performance evolves. The steady stream is artfully included into some of the pieces, used as both a metronome and a centerpiece of the action.

 

At first, the performances are overwhelming – to what should you pay attention? It seems equally as important to try to uncover Mozart’s influence in each piece, listen to the lyrics of the songs, focus on the actors’ physical routines and try to make sense of it all. In fact, it’s nearly impossible. Luckily, you are provided with song lyrics (in both English and Danish), so during the intermission you can excitedly flip through the pages to find that, yes, that song was in fact about atheism.

 

Despite its obvious eclectic elements – such as rope-swinging from a bathtub and wading through a bubble-flooded stage – the show maintains a balance between new and old. At one point, the actors cleverly wrap cloth around their heads to perfectly emulate powdered wigs, paying homage to the 18th century. 

 

With the juxtaposition of an electric guitar and a piano, corsets and plastic bird beaks, and melodies you may recognise and lyrics you certainly won’t, ‘Mozart’ is definitely a show to check out – just be sure to go with an open mind. 

 

Mozart 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.